Why take SAT subject tests?

 

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Know the Pros and Cons Before Taking SAT Subject Tests 

Fall is a busy testing season for high school students, and even more so for seniors applying to college. In addition to the ACT or SAT, some students also choose to take SAT Subject Tests as part of their admissions testing. But is it right for you?more

What are SAT Subject Tests?

SAT Subject Tests are 1-hour long, multiple-choice exams focused on one subject-area. The College Board administers the tests on the same day as the regular SAT. Students can take up to three subject tests on test-day, and The College Board offers exams in 20 subjects, including math, history, science, foreign language, and more.

Not all subjects are offered on all test-dates, so it’s important to plan ahead and create a testing timeline and plan if you decide to take an SAT Subject Test.

Why Do Some Colleges Request SAT Subject Test Scores?

Scores from SAT Subject Tests are required for admission at some US universities. However, as more and more colleges have become test-optional or test-flexible over the last few years, many colleges are starting to drop or modify their SAT Subject Test requirements. According to NACAC’s annual college admissions report, 23% of colleges place limited importance on SAT Subject Tests, while 63% consider them not important. So if they’re easily expendable, why do some colleges require them in the first place?

For some colleges, SAT Subject Tests are just one more way to evaluate students’ college readiness. For other colleges, it’s just one more piece of the admissions puzzle to provide context for students’ applications. Opinions on SAT Subject Tests vary from school to school, so it’s important to do your research on application requirements when building your balanced college list to determine if SAT Subject Test scores are important for your college application.

Should I Take SAT Subject Tests?

Just like the SAT and ACT, students should only take SAT Subject Tests if it’s a good fit and they’re prepared. If you struggle with standardized testing, submitting average or sub-par subject test scores won’t help your application. Consider your abilities, needs, and goals before taking SAT Subject Tests.

Here’s when you should consider taking SAT Subject Tests:

  1. It’s required as part of your application. This might seem like a no-brainer, but many students either forget to submit subject test scores as part of their application or just don’t know it’s a requirement for some colleges. If you’re applying to a college that requires, or even recommends, you submit subject test scores as part of your application, do it.
  2. You want to demonstrate a specialty. In addition to courses and activities, SAT Subject Test scores can be used to demonstrate a specialty, like science, math, history, or other academic area of interest. This can strengthen your application by showing admissions officers you are committed to this academic interest.
  3. You want to demonstrate an academic strength that might not be apparent in your transcript. Maybe you’re a strong science student, but your high school doesn’t offer many advanced courses in subjects like biology, chemistry, or physics. In addition to self studying for the AP exams or taking courses at a local community college, taking the corresponding SAT Subject Test can be another way to demonstrate your knowledge of that subject and how it relates to your college plans.

How to Prepare for SAT Subject Tests

First, decide whether or not subject testing is a good fit for you. If you have a preliminary list of colleges that require or recommend subject test scores, then you should start putting together a plan as part of your test prep.

Next, decide which tests to take. If you intend to pursue a STEM major, then choose the science or math-related subjects that align best with your intended course of study in college. If you’ve recently taken a chemistry class, consider taking the chemistry subject test, as the information will still be fresh in your memory.

Take a diagnostic of the test to see where you stand and where you need to improve. Then, make a study schedule and timeline, and leave plenty of time to study and prepare before taking the exam.

If you’re struggling with improving your score, seek help from a teacher or tutor. At Planet EduTrain we have tutors who can help you reach your goal score on your SAT Subject Tests.

SAT Subject Tests are just another piece of the college admissions puzzle, and students should carefully consider the benefits and drawbacks to subject tests before deciding to take them as part of their college preparation.

For more information on testing, test prep, and how to stand out when applying to college, be sure to join our mailing list and follow us on Facebook and Twitter.

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US college admissions weekly newsletter (Oct 10, 2016)

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Redesigned SAT: Preparation Tips

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It’s test prep season for high school juniors, and many will start preparing for the SAT or ACT this fall in anticipation of spring exam administrations. This year saw a lot of changes to the SAT, and for students just becoming familiar with the new exam there are a number of test prep tips to keep in mind that are very different from strategies promoted for the old test. More…

Dos and Don’ts of Essays

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The essay is often the college application component where students experience the most stress, and the element where they’re more likely to make mistakes. College admissions essays are not rocket science, but there are a number of steps that students can take to put together the most accurate and compelling essays that will help their chances of gaining admission to their top-choice colleges. More…

Plant the Seeds for College Prep Now: Advice for Freshmen

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Preparing for college is a lot like growing a beautiful garden. It takes time, patience, and the right combination of nurturing and independence to help the seeds of college ideas grow into bountiful plans. 9thgrade is the ideal time to start cultivating those sprouts of college dreams, as it gives students time to mature and explore subjects and activities that interest them, and that will eventually grow into education and career goals. More…

Education Expo Guide and Checklist

college_fair

Fall is education expos season, and juniors everywhere will have the opportunity to explore different colleges/universities and learn more about universities they’re interested in applying to next year. Expos are a great opportunity to get student’s interest piqued in the college/university admissions process while also providing them with valuable information needed to make informed higher education decisions. More…

Case-study to Harvard

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Bradley knew his chance of getting into Harvard was less than 5%, yet he wanted to go there more than anything else in life. His grades and test-scores were upper average and he came from a small town in Colorado.
He couldn’t claim any type of diversity, so he knew he had to do something radical if he wanted to have a chance.

In the months leading up to submission, he took a close look at his main extracurricular activities, brainstormed his possibilities and began to take steps that would reveal his potential to make an impact on the campus of Harvard, as well as UPenn, Berekley and Georgetown.

His resume showed that he had a demonstrated interest in the environment as well as a passion for drawing. So, through brainstorming, he arrived at a plan to design and implement a series of coloring books for kids to engage with eco-friendly issues. He was nervous to start, but his desire to get to Harvard trumped his nervousness.

He researched the main issues in a variety of third-world countries and decided to focus on the ocean. He then drilled-down to focus on the problem of over-fishing. He would openly admit that his coloring book was “not great” but by sending emails to every non-profit he could find that was related to over-fishing and the environment, he soon had several interested parties.

Within weeks of launching his “initiative” he had sent his coloring books to Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. He was getting feedback and user-testing from a non-profit in Laos and he posted his project online to make it accessible to other non-profits through a variety of links.

He wrote about his process and success in his main common app essay. Bradley joined the incoming class at Harvard University in the fall.

College Admissions Interview Guide

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Admissions Interviews Can Help You Stand Out and Demonstrate Interest

Now that we are at the height of application season, it’s a good idea to start preparing for the possibility of a college admissions interview. This is a chance for the college to put a face to the name on your application, and it is your opportunity to stand out and provide some additional context for your application.

While many large universities don’t typically offer admissions interviews, smaller colleges or specific programs at larger institutions sometimes recommend students do an interview as part of their application. This is part of the holistic review process, and is just another way for the admissions committee to get to know you better. Admissions interviews are also a big part of the graduate admissions process.

While this may seem intimidating, the more stressed you are during the interview, the less your true colors will be able to shine through. It is important to harness this energy and use it to your advantage to present your best self!

Here are some tips on how to ace your college admissions interview.

Be Prepared

You want to treat this like a job interview and show the interviewer a demonstrated interest in the school at hand. Be prepared and do your research. Your interviewer will fully expect that you are knowledgeable about the school that you are applying to and they will test this knowledge during your time together. They will also expect for you to be able to explain why you want to attend and how you plan to contribute to the campus community if admitted.

Practice Makes Perfect
Be sure to practice your handshake, posture and body language for your interview. Also be sure to practice potential interview questions beforehand so you do not feel blindsided by any questions that they may ask. Have different people ask you questions in different ways so you are ready for anything when the time comes.

Be Mindful of Small Gestures
There are a few small things that can make a big difference when going into any interview, whether it be for college admissions or a job. Make sure that you are about 10-15 minutes early for the meeting, and make sure to dress as you would for a job interview. Making eye contact and proving a strong handshake and proper interview etiquette will go a long way. Additionally, turn your cell phone off and block out any potential distractions prior to the meeting.

Confidence is Key
Firstly, relax and be yourself. The more stressed out you are, the more likely you are to stumble, forget your answers, or not present your best-self. Confidence is always key in situations like this where someone is trying to read you. Treat it like a conversation and avoid being too scripted or memorizing anything. Avoid answering the questions based on what you think they want to hear. Be genuine and let your true colors shine through. They will recognize and appreciate your confidence!

Stand Out
One sure way to stand out is to send a handwritten thank you note to your interviewer after the meeting. Be sure to thank him or her for their time, and mention something that you discussed during the meeting that will help them remember you.

We are here to help you tackle the admissions process with confidence and ease. Contact us today for more information on our services for college application assistance and interview prep.

2017: Commonwealth Scholarships for Master’s and PhD study – developing Commonwealth country citizens

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Commonwealth Scholarships for Master’s and PhD Studies in the UK

Deadline:15 November 2016

Applicants are invited to apply for Commonwealth Scholarships for Master’s and PhD Studies in the UK. These scholarships are funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), with the aim of contributing to the UK’s international development aims and wider overseas interests, supporting excellence in UK higher education, and sustaining the principles of the Commonwealth.

All subject areas are eligible, although the CSC’s selection criteria give priority to applications that demonstrate the strongest relevance to development.

Levels

Applicants can apply for a Commonwealth Scholarship for the following levels of study:

  • Master’s (one-year courses only)
  • PhD

Eligibility Criteria

To apply for these scholarships, applicants must:

  • Be a Commonwealth citizen, refugee, or British protected person
  • Be permanently resident in a developing Commonwealth country
  • Be available to start your academic studies in the UK by the start of the UK academic year in September/October 2017
  • By October 2017, hold a first degree of at least upper second class (2:1) honors standard, or a second class degree and a relevant postgraduate qualification (usually a Master’s degree)

How to Apply

Applications must be submitted online via the website.

Eligible Countries

Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, Bangladesh, Barbados, Belize, Bermuda, Botswana, Cameroon, Cayman Islands, Dominica, Falkland Islands, Fiji, Ghana, Gibraltar, Grenada, Guyana, India, Jamaica, Kenya, Kiribati,Lesotho, Malawi, Malaysia, Maldives, Mauritius, Montserrat, Mozambique, Namibia, Nauru, Nigeria,Pakistan, Papua New Guinea, Pitcairn Islands, Rwanda, St Helena, St Kitts and Nevis, St Lucia, St Vincent and The Grenadines, Samoa, Seychelles, Sierra Leone, Solomon Islands, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Swaziland, Tanzania, Tonga, Trinidad and Tobago, Turks and Caicos Islands, Tuvalu, Uganda, Vanuatu, Virgin Islands (British), Zambia.

 


 

Application pack: Commonwealth Scholarships for Master’s and PhD Studies in the UK

Deadline: November 15, 2016 | 23.59  (GMT)
Location: UK

Fully Funded !!

Overview:

Commonwealth Scholarships for Master’s and PhD study in the UK are offered for citizens of developing Commonwealth countries. These scholarships are funded by the UK Department for International Development (DFID), with the aim of contributing to the UK’s international development aims and wider overseas interests, supporting excellence in UK higher education, and sustaining the principles of the Commonwealth. For information on other scholarships offered by the CSC, visit our Apply page.

You can apply for a Commonwealth Scholarship for the following levels of study:

  • Master’s (one-year courses only)
  • PhD

All subject areas are eligible, although the CSC’s selection criteria give priority to applications that demonstrate the strongest relevance to development.

You should apply to study at a UK university with which the CSC has a part funding agreement. Click here for a list of UK universities which have part funding agreements with the CSC

Eligibility:

To apply for these scholarships, you must:

  • Be a Commonwealth citizen, refugee, or British protected person
  • Be permanently resident in a developing Commonwealth country
  • Be available to start your academic studies in the UK by the start of the UK academic year in September/October 2017
  • By October 2017, hold a first degree of at least upper second class (2:1) honours standard, or a second class degree and a relevant postgraduate qualification (usually a Master’s degree)

The CSC promotes equal opportunity, gender equity, and cultural exchange. Applications are encouraged from a diverse range of candidates. The CSC is committed to administering and managing its scholarships and fellowships in a fair and transparent manner – for more information, see the CSC anti-fraud policy.

Terms and conditions:

For full terms and conditions, see the Commonwealth Scholarships 2017 terms and conditions

If you are applying for PhD study, you may, if you wish, propose to study at one university for a four-year PhD, but this must be based in a recognised Doctoral Training Centre. You must research this option thoroughly (further details can be found on the websites of the individual Research Councils in the UK) and justify the added value of this above a three-year PhD. As the CSC will fund only a limited number of four-year PhDs, if you do choose this option, you are strongly advised to also propose at least one three-year PhD choice.

Value of scholarships:
Each scholarship provides:
  • Approved airfare from your home country to the UK and return at the end of your award (the CSC will not reimburse the cost of fares for dependents, nor usually the cost of journeys made before your award is finally confirmed)
  •  Approved tuition and examination fees
  •  Stipend (living allowance) at the rate of £1,043 per month, or £1,279 per month for those at universities in the London metropolitan area (rates quoted at 2016 – 2017 levels)
  •  Thesis grant towards the cost of preparing a thesis or dissertation, where applicable
  •  Warm clothing allowance, where applicable
  •  Study travel grant towards the costs of study – related travel within the UK or overseas
  •  For PhD Scholars, fieldwork grant towards the cost of fieldwork undertaken overseas (usually the cost of one economy class return airfare to your fieldwork location), where approved
  •  For PhD Scholars, paid mid – term visit (airfare) to your home country (unless you have claimed (or intend to claim) spouse and/or child allowances during your scholarship, or have received a return airfare to your home country for fieldwork)
  •  If your scholarship is at least 18 months long, the following family allowances:
  •  Spouse allowance of £224 per month if you and your spouse are living together at the same address in the UK (unless your spouse is also in receipt of a scholarship; other conditions also apply)
  •  Child allowance of £224 per month for the first child, and £110 per month for the second and third child under the age of 16, if you are accompanied by your spouse and children and they are living with you at the same address in the UK
  •  If you are widowed, divorced, or a single parent (irrespective of the length of your scholarship), child allowance of £448 per month for the first child, and £110 per month for the second and third child under the age of 16, if you are accompanied by your children and they are living with you at the same address in the UK The CSC’s family allowances are intended to be only a contribution towards the cost of maintaining your family in the UK. The true costs are likely to be considerably higher, and you must be able to supplement these allowances in order to support any family members who come to the UK with you.
For more information, see the Handbook for Commonwealth Scholars and Fellows, available at http://bit.ly/cscuk-handbook-forms

Selection process:

Each year, the CSC invites selected nominating bodies to submit a specific number of nominations. The deadline for nominating bodies to submit nominations to the CSC is 13 December 2016.

The CSC invites around three times more nominations than scholarships available – therefore, nominated candidates are not guaranteed to be awarded a scholarship. There are no quotas for scholarships for any individual country. Candidates nominated by national nominating agencies are in competition with those nominated by other nominating bodies, and the same standards will be applied to applications made through either channel.

Each nominated candidate’s application is first considered by a member of the CSC’s panel of advisers with expertise in the subject area concerned, and then by the CSC’s selection committee in competition with other candidates.

Applications are considered according to the following selection criteria:

  • Academic merit of the candidate
  • Quality of the plan of study
  • Potential impact of the work on the development of the candidate’s home country

For further details, see the Selection criteria for 2017 Commonwealth Scholarships for Master’s and PhD study

You may also find the Feedback for unsuccessful candidates useful.

How to apply:

You must apply to one of the following nominating bodies in the first instance – the CSC does not accept direct applications for these scholarships:

All applications must be made through your nominating body in your home country. Each nominating body is responsible for its own selection process. You must check with your nominating body for their specific advice and rules for applying, their own eligibility criteria, and their own closing date for applications. The CSC does not impose any age limit on applicants, but nominating bodies may do so in line with their own priorities.

You must make an application using the CSC’s Electronic Application System (EAS), in addition to any other application form that you are required to complete by your nominating body. Click here for full information on how to use the EAS, including detailed guides.

Your application must be submitted to and endorsed by one of the approved nominating bodies listed above. The CSC will not accept any applications that are not submitted via the EAS to a nominating body in your home country.

All applications must be submitted by 23.59 (GMT) on 15 November 2016 at the latest.

You are advised to complete and submit your application as soon as possible, as the EAS will be very busy in the days leading up to the application deadline.

You must provide the following supporting documentation to be received by the CSC by 6 January 2017 in order for your application to be eligible for consideration:

  • References from at least two individuals
  • Transcripts
  • For PhD candidates only, supporting statement from a proposed supervisor in the UK from at least one of the institutions named on your application form

How to use the EAS

Please note that the CSC does not charge candidates to apply for any of its scholarships or fellowships through its Electronic Application System (EAS), and it does not charge organisations to nominate candidates.

Choosing a university/course:

You may find the following resources useful when researching your choices of institution and course of study in the UK:

Education Expo Guide and Checklist

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Fall is education expos season, and juniors everywhere will have the opportunity to explore different colleges/universities and learn more about universities they’re interested in applying to next year. Expos are a great opportunity to get student’s interest piqued in the college/university admissions process while also providing them with valuable information needed to make informed higher education decisions.

As a counselor and former admissions officer I see the value in attending an expo/fair, especially for students who are just starting to think about what they want out of their university experience. That is why I developed this guide to help students get the most out of education expos. Below are some tips on what students need to do before, during, and after the expo to maximize the experience and get the information they need in order to find their best-fit colleges.

Before the Expo

Meet with your university counselor.
University counselors can help with identifying majors and suggesting which universities to visit at the expo/fair. Make time to meet prior to the expo to go over your goals, needs, and what exactly you’re looking for in a university so your counselor can make informed recommendations.

Plan your timeline.
After receiving university suggestions from your counselor, plan which booths you’d like to visit during the expo. If your list is long, make sure to allot enough time to visit all the schools you’re interested in. Plan to visit your top-choice colleges/universities first, then leave time to visit other schools of interest toward the end of the expo. It’s easy to get caught up in conversation and spent a lot of time at one booth – set a time limit for each stop and stick to it if you’ve gotten all the information you need from that representative.

Plan what questions to ask.
The education expo is one of the best opportunities to get information on colleges/universities straight from the source. This is important when building your balanced college list, as you can get relevant information needed to make informed decisions directly from the person who works there. Here are a few examples of questions that students should ask when speaking with a university representative at an education expo—pick ones most important to you:

  • What type(s) of students succeed at that school?
  • Location (urban, rural, suburbs)? How many students live on campus?
  • Class size? Student teacher ratio? TA’s vs. professors teaching classes?
  • How diverse is the campus? Student organizations? Crime rate?
  • Admission requirements? GPA? Test scores? Portfolios?
  • How selective is admissions? Male to female ratio?
  • Deadlines for applications? Honors Programs? Scholarships?
  • Visitation/orientation programs? Year-abroad programs?
  • Will they guarantee to meet 100% of student’s financial need?
  • What percentage of students graduate in four years?
  • What’s the retention rate—how many students return after freshman year?

During the Expo

Bring a notebook and pen.
You’ll be getting a lot of information, so write it down! Take notes as you’re talking with reps so you can keep track of who said what. Also, jot down general impressions as well as specific things you want to remember. Recalling details is impressive in follow-up conversations with that college and can come in handy when visiting or writing your application essays.

Get on the mailing list.
Stay in touch! One of the easiest ways to sign up for communications is to leave a completed interest card with reps, or come to the expo with pre-printed, self-stick address labels. Save time and spare yourself an aching hand by having a label ready—colleges appreciate being able to read them too! Make sure to get the rep’s contact information, too, in case you have any follow-up questions after the expo.

Leave time for browsing.
After you’ve visited with the colleges on your list, you may want to visit a few that weren’t but look interesting to you. You may find an unexpected treasure!

Be independent.
Even if several friends plan to visit the same college booth, don’t all go together. You’ll have plenty of time to share notes later. You have your own questions to ask, and you’ll want the reps undivided attention.

Remember to…

  • Represent yourself and your school with pride. Colleges want to see students excited about their education and their plans for the future.
  • Introduce yourself using eye contact and a hand- shake. Tell the rep you’re from “X” High School.First impressions count! Make a good one.
  • Conduct yourself as an adult. This is your chance to show you’re mature and prepared for college.
  • Take your time—don’t rush through exhibits. There will be a lot of colleges represented. Make sure you see everything you want to see.
  • Ask pertinent questions. This is your chance to get some good information straight from the source – don’t be afraid to ask questions.

After the Expo

Go over all the information you collected.
After the expo, find time to look through all the brochures and info you collected—look them over and review your notes. Decide which schools you’d like to research further and which are taking a back seat.

Follow up
Once you have a good idea about the colleges you want to pursue further, follow up with the rep you met with an email. Ask any additional questions you may have, and thank him or her for their time. This is a great way to build a relationship with the rep who might ultimately read your application and demonstrate your interest in that particular college.

Education expos are an important tool in your college preparation journey, so make the most of them! For more information on researching colleges and building your balanced college list, be sure to follow our blog and newsletter. If you needed additional help selecting best-fit colleges and preparing for the college admissions process, contact us today for more information on our college counseling services.

Plant the Seeds for College Prep Now: Advice for Freshmen

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Preparing for college is a lot like growing a beautiful garden. It takes time, patience, and the right combination of nurturing and independence to help the seeds of college ideas grow into bountiful plans. 9thgrade is the ideal time to start cultivating those sprouts of college dreams, as it gives students time to mature and explore subjects and activities that interest them, and that will eventually grow into education and career goals.

Just as with gardening, it all starts with identifying exactly what you want and what those goals need to flourish.

Acquire Some Tools
Can you imagine creating a garden using just your bare hands? It would be crazy to launch into this project without the proper tools—a shovel, rake, trowel, maybe a wheelbarrow. But this is exactly what many students do with their schoolwork. The added rigor of high school academics, compared to middle school, hits many students by surprise. Freshman year is a good time to assess whether you have the right tools for the job.

Some of the biggest pitfalls students fall into are procrastination, disorganization, ineffective study habits (including distracted studying), and not seeking help. Students need to become disciplined to attain the grades they need in order to achieve their college goals.

Organization is critical to success: face your disorganization, find a system that is foolproof, and stick to it. Some students spend hours studying, but still don’t see results. Embracing smart study habits, including putting away ALL electronics and studying in focused chunks of time, followed by short breaks, will make a huge difference.

Many bright students find it difficult to ask for help—to tell teachers that they don’t understand something or to seek out a tutor for subjects that are challenging. Get in the habit as early as possible in your high school career to never be too proud or embarrassed or lazy to ask for help. This “tool” will pay off in spades as the material gets more challenging throughout high school and in college.

There are self-help books and professional coaches and tutors that can provide excellent advice for ways to tackle these common issues and to arm yourself with the proper tools for success.

Pull the Weeds and Plant the Flowers
Freshman year is an ideal time to reinvent yourself or to intentionally choose activities and friendships that align with your interests and values. Middle school years are tough and you may have found yourself in social survival mode. It usually gets better in high school! Now is the time to fully be who you want to be.

If your current friends think math club is for dorks, but you have secretly been working on math puzzles in your free time, have courage and go to a math club meeting. If you have always wanted to play a team sport, but your siblings are all bookworms, go to tryouts anyway. These specific examples might not resonate with you, but consider the ways in which you are living according to someone else’s values and agenda (even your parents!) Do an inventory of the components in your life and begin shedding parts that don’t genuinely reflect your best self and your goals. Now might be a good time to explore sides of yourself that you have kept hidden or have just discovered. The sooner you live fully and openly in the reality of who you really are, the happier you will be and the more success you will have in your activities.

Add Some Fertilizer
Give a plant some water and sun, and it will usually eek out a meager existence. Add some fertilizer to that plant and it will thrive, producing stunning flowers or delicious fruit in abundance. It’s the same with people. Don’t neglect to add some fertilizer to your life in addition to the essential water and sun, if you want to thrive.

The thriving student is inherently interesting, the type of student who will never go out of fashion in the ever-changing world of selective college admissions. The key to thriving is to delve deeply into the academic areas and extracurricular activities that genuinely excite you. Do not be a follower! Just because other students have been accepted into Dream School by winning prizes in science fairs and doing certain summer enrichment programs doesn’t mean that you should take that path to get into Dream School. Get off the hamster wheel, and take a step back to figure out what truly interests you and what truly matters to you.

Read as much unassigned material as you can; watch documentaries; pursue hobbies; seek out adults who know something about a subject that you’re curious about and learn from their experience. I can’t stress enough the importance of the time you spend applying this kind of “fertilizer” to your mind and heart. Keep an open mind, these explorations will lead you to a good place, maybe not the place you expected, but the right place for you to blossom to your full potential.

It’s never too early to start nurturing college dreams, so start now! Give those bulbs of plans and goals time to grow healthy and strong, and keep cultivating new pursuits as you get further into identifying the things that really interest you and shape your ambitions.

We recommend students start college preparation as early as possible, as colleges examine all four years of high school academics and activities.